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April 19, 2007

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you better start making stacks for the winter. like candied citrus peel etc. You can hardly be blamed about using the stuff you already have can you? And you can't let valuable food go to waste, can you?! (I think you also solve the peanut butter problem in this way) And if nothing works, ask your Dad, he with his particular logic and way of looking at food probably finds a loophole for you!

If you shorten your radius, do you get more points? I think the Taco Bell/KFC in Central Square is < 10 miles from your home. Problem solved.

Tammy - I think you're taking this "eat local" thing waaaaay too seriously. It's supposed to be more of a way of viewing our life choices. It helps to sustain local/artisian producers instead of pouring money into the coffers of industry producers. But remember - the dairy you're buying your milk from also sells it to Meadowgold (or whatever milk company exists out there). And if by buying local you think you can "control" how much/what chemicals are used in the production of your food, so much the better. Remember, "organic" has a very broad definition. If you want to go organic, then you're probably not going to do a whole lot of "local". So, you buy those oranges from California if you want and don't beat yourself up too much. Search out what local farmers are offering. Buy what you can (and can afford - it's expensive!) and try to eat as fresh as possible. Remember - this is a life style, not a competition. You won't be getting graded on this. And, good luck with that garden! Let me know if you need any help. After all - I AM a Master Gardener.

Sally: No grades? What do you mean? If I start out half-assing it now, where will I be at Week 2? You're going to be sorry you ever mentioned your gardening credentials.

Finger Lickin: Well, we know at least one thing they have on the menu that's local.

Ilva: I don't need too much help in the cheating department, but it's nice to know he's there.

You are allowed to answer your questions to your own satisfaction; we won't be sending the locacops over. :D
I think you're taking the right approach by thinking things over and planning ahead... and you probably don't have to drag your kids into this diet if you think they'll freak.
My advice is to learn early where to get the other ingredients (non-produce) you'll be using during the challenge. Can you find locally made mustard? If not, can you do without it? Do you have a source for local cooking oils? Butter? Sugar is probably out, so you'll want to find local honey. Do you have local wheat? If not, no bread.
OR: Simply do your best and allow yourself exemptions.

I'm admittedly a bit divided (and somewhat amused) by this whole "local food" movement. Most people around the world eat locally out of necessity. I was just recently in India, and of course most of the food (since not too much is packaged there yet) is local, but then again, it is pretty easy to grow things there year round than say, in Canada where the ground is frozen half the year. And boy the food does taste better there--I'm not sure if it's organic, but I know it's fresh. On the other hand, eating packaged food (sort of like in North America in the 1950s) is a novelty and for affluent people, so it can set a class distinction.
I do like shopping at farmer's markets when I can, but quite frankly I'm not going to spend too much time shopping for food (especially when I could be cooking and eating it). And unfortunately, I like pineapples and strawberries year round.
Still I would definitely support proper costing of products, so that non-organic and processed stuff should cost more. I think it's horrible that a litre of Coke costs less than a litre of milk.

One more reason to come and visit your sister; eating "local" here involves pineapple upside down cake, guacamole, macadamia nut crusted mahi mahi, the best damned goat cheese EVER and if you get a hankering for some ribs... you can shoot that freakin' cow that moos in a most unpleasant way at 4am.

Oh yeah... and you can eat all this stuff at the beach in December.

Plenty citrus too... our lemon tree is bursting so I'll soon be asking for recipes...

Changed your mind yet? Or am I just making my way to the top of your hit list?

Sister: Mark me down for a visit during the 2008 Eat Local Challenge, for sure. The whole month, baby.

Sunny12: It's just a fun experiment. I don't plan on giving up my pineapples and imported basmati rice forever. Just a little while so I appreciate them more, and maybe find some cool local stuff I never knew about before.

CC: Sounds reasonable. I'll do my sourcing, then write out my exemptions. I'm not going to starve my kids, but I'm not making separate meals, either.

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